Happy Effectiveness: One Skill That Radically Improves Performance

Effectiveness is commonly measured in terms of achieving goals as quickly as possible (and as efficiently, too). In companies, for endeavors in business and in personal life, we want to have effectiveness. In fact, the effective executive has become the stereotype of success.

Effectiveness is commonly measured in terms of achieving goals as quickly as possible (and as efficiently, too). In companies, for endeavors in business and in personal life, we want to have effectiveness. In fact, the effective executive has become the stereotype of success.

 

But it comes with a price. No matter how high we praise effectiveness in the performance of our businesses, we tend to forget about an important aspect in our executives and CEOs: the human factor.

 

Effectiveness alone, contrary to common belief, does not constitute happiness. In fact, our high opinion of effectiveness plays a big role in the forthcoming of the movement that is labeled with the inherently flawed buzzword “work-life-balance.” (This term suggests that work is not part of life and that living has nothing to do with working. If you need a work-life-balance you should seriously reconsider how you earn money.)

 

The idea behind it is valid, especially in the uprising numbers of cases of burnout and depression. Intuitively, we understand that what is missing in the lives of workaholics and stressors who overachieve is some sort balance. The assumption, however, that the executive needs to have a “happy time” outside of work so she can endure the torturing hours in which she needs to be effective, cannot be true.

 

And psychologists come to understand this truth more and more: In order to be a successful executive, one has to be happily effective.

 

It does not need much training for executives and leaders to be able to use their mind not only effectively but also to keep a consistent positive emotional state.

 

Problem-solving, decision-making, and communicating are the key skills of executives. No other factor influences these disciplines more radically than the emotional state of the person doing these things.

 

A positive focus of mind with momentum behind it increases intelligence, productivity, and reduces stress. It also motivates co-workers and enhances high performance, from giving feedback to closing a sale. The positive effect is also ongoing from moment to moment, which adds an important quality which is prevalent in the argument that advocates for mindfulness make.

 

Happiness is what anybody wants anyway. Anything anybody wants is because they think they will be happier once they have achieved what they want. Once executives are happier the business performance will increase drastically.

 

Marc Breetzke, M.A., M.A. is the founder and head of

MB Inspirations. He helps companies and individuals all over the world

to create their next breakthrough in business and personal life

in order to accelerate the realization of their desires and goals.

For more information visit MB Inspirations online www.mbinspirations.com

or connect with us via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and on Snapchat.

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Comments: 1
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